What’s your every day carry? 2016

I’ve always been a fan of these kinds of posts so every couple of years I do an update of what I keep in my work bag and what I have as my every day carry:

Every Day Carry

All-Ett Wallet

I’ve been using the same All-Ett leather sports wallet for just over four years now and I still love how small it is. I would definitely recommend this kind of wallet to someone who’s looking for something minimal.

I usually carry between four and six cards, some folded money, and any receipts or note cards I have recently collected.

The thought of replacing it has crossed my mind… not because it is in any way defective, but because I think I’d like to get a wallet which blocks radio signals passing through. This would block the contactless card inside from being used unless it is removed from the wallet.

Of course, All-Ett do a version which is just like the one I have with the addition of this blocking technology. I’ll probably get one of these next time I feel like I need an upgrade.

Windows Mobile

I’ve used Windows mobile phones for over a decade now, and I still feel most productive when I have a Windows device on me at all times.

I got the Lumia 950 XL a year ago and it’s still one of the best Windows phones on the market. Yes, I know that for many people the platform isn’t moving fast enough for them, but I don’t currently have any interest in switching – most of the apps I want are already here.

The top uses for my phone are productivity (Outlook, OneNote, Wunderlist), communication (Slack, Skype, Messenger), and entertainment (Groove, Audible, Pocket Casts). It has 200 GB SD card loaded up with tonnes of music and offline maps for use while driving. It’s also the the camera I use the most, and I have it synchronised with OneDrive so that everything goes up into the cloud.

One of the biggest complaints about the Lumia 950 XL was that it isn’t particularly eye-catching. I tend to agree, and the standard plastic back was quickly replaced with a premium cover by Mozo. I find it makes the phone feel significantly nicer in the hand, and the real leather on the back gives the phone a warm feeling and a nice grip.

Wallet and Phone

As well as the Mozo cover, I also use a leather sleeve from FitBag. I mostly use this when I’m travelling or putting my phone in my bag or my jacket pocket. It protects the screen complements my leather wallet really well. I have actually found that putting the phone in the sleeve makes me less likely to check it for no real reason – when in meetings, for example.

Overall I’m happy with the Lumia 950 XL for now, and I hope it’ll keep me going until Microsoft builds an ultra-portable Surface which includes ink support.

Microsoft Band

Since my last every day carry post there have been two versions of Microsoft Band, and I’m currently using the Band 2. The old Fitbit got me started with health tracking, but having a device on my wrist is much better.

I really like the Microsoft Band, but it’s possible that this might be the last version of it. Rumours are that the Band 3 has been cancelled and there’s no replacement coming. I have a spare Band 2 to keep me going for now, and I’m just going to hope that there is a Windows-power wearable device in the works.

Band and Lumia

KeySmart & Car Key

And last of all… keys. Everyone has to have some keys in their every day carry.

I got a KeySmart in June last year when I moved and had the opportunity to reduce the number of keys I have to carry around. I’ve dropped it a couple of times since and they’ve been just fine – and I’ve never had them come apart in my pocket or anything like that.

I love how they don’t jingle and move around when I run, but the lack of jingle also means I often double-double check I have them with me! As before, I keep them separated from my car key.

Sony MDR-EX750BT Headphones

It was only a few months ago I wrote about my Sony MDR-100ABN noise cancelling headphones which have been absolutely perfect for listening to music in my home office.

I mentioned that I can split my earphone use into two main situations:

  • Indoors or working at a desk
  • Outdoors or in public places

The MDR-100ABN was squarely placed for use indoors at home, and I mentioned that I also had two additional sets of earphones that I regularly use with my phone – wired and wireless. I was very disappointed that my wired earphones broke soon after publishing that article. It was my sixth pair of Nokia WH-920 in-ear headphones I’d had, and they were less than 6 months old.

My experiences with the MDR-100ABN made me think that a s set of in-ear headphones in the same Sony range would be a good idea. I would see if I could replace both my wired and wireless headphones with a single set which I could use in all other situations.

Sony MDR-EX750BT

When looking into my options for over-ear headphones I had looked through Sony’s whole line of h.ear headphones, with particular attention to the Bluetooth offerings.

The MDR-EX750BT looked like the best fit for outdoor use, but like last time I took the same qualities into consideration before making the purchase.

Sony MDR-EX750BT Headphones

Comfort

I know a lot of people are not keen on the in-ear style headphones, but I’ve been using them for many years. It’s only recently that I started using over-ear headphones at all.

As expected the earbuds fit well and I have had no discomfort from them – even when using them to listen to music for 12 hours worth of travel.

The main electronics of the headphones go behind-the-neck. I have previously found this to be a good option for Bluetooth headsets and until battery technology improves I don’t think there is any better alternative.

The main electronics are not heavy, and you hardly notice that it is behind your neck. The exception would be if you are running, but I wouldn’t recommend using this style of earphone for running anyway.

Practicality

This time I wanted a smaller device that I could keep with me every day and use while I am at work, walking around or using public transport.

It’s always a gamble when it comes to battery life for these kinds of devices and like with the MDR-100ABN I have been pleasantly surprised at how long they work. I’ve easily gone for a full day out with it wirelessly connected to my Lumia 950 XL – using it for music for a good proportion of that time.

Unfortunately the MDR-EX750BT also don’t support Bluetooth multipoint. Ideally I’ve love to be able to seamlessly be able to switch audio from my Lumia and Surface without having to go through the effort of pairing again. Maybe next time.

For times when I don’t want to use the battery, I can use a provided Micro USB #x2192; 3.5mm Audio cable. I think I would have preferred a standard audio cable, but everything works as you’d expect so I am not going to complain too loudly.

Freedom

Bluetooth connectivity is fast becoming a must-have for my headphones and the biggest factor is the freedom that it affords. Knowing I can walk to another room without having to unplug cables is really liberating.

An additional freedom is offered hear by easily keeping them on at all times and just plugging in when required. They hang from your neck and provide easy access while the phone is either in my pocket or on a desk.

Audio Quality

Audio quality is always something I want, but for me it’s a “I’ll know it when I hear it” kind of deal – and in this case, I know that it sounds good. Some of the Bluetooth headphones I have used in the past sound obviously compressed, but I can’t tell much difference between this headset and wired headphones.

Noise Isolation

I would have loved to have had the same active noise cancellation technology I have enjoyed on the MDR-100ABN, but I have yet to find some behind-the-neck style Bluetooth headphones that have it.

It’s not a problem though, as the in-ear style headphones isolate external sound by design.

The in-ear style is also better for isolating sound leaking out of the headphones. Unlike my over-ear headphones I use at home, I use these in-ear headphones out in public and in quiet environments like offices.

Final Thoughts

For now I have consolidated on two sets of headphones, both are wireless but support wired as backups. Both meet my requirements in different ways, and both work great with my Surface and Lumia.

Sony Wireless Headphones

Two Weeks with Microsoft Band 2

First off, all the sensors and technology in the first Microsoft Band is still in the new 2015 version, but now we have a barometer too, taking the count up to eleven.

  1. Heart rate monitor
  2. GPS
  3. Accelerometer
  4. Gyrometer
  5. Light sensor
  6. Microphone
  7. UV sensors
  8. Thermometer
  9. Capacitive sensor
  10. Galvanic skin response
  11. Barometer

The real changes are in how the device feels on my wrist.

The screen is now curved and made of glass, the main body is now metal and also curves around the wrist. The band itself is now significantly more flexible (as it doesn’t include the batteries) and the overall experience is one of a much higher quality device.

New Microsoft Band

I didn’t really have any problems with the original device feeling too bulky at the time, but when compared to this updated version it would be hard to go back.

There are other less obvious changes too. The software on the device is much nicer to use – the team has clearly been listening to feedback and made various screens much more useful. An example is pausing a run. The previous version was all too easy to accidently end the run by brushing the screen with your finger by mistake – now you need to swipe across and press the end run button.

The existing sensors have also been put to better use too. You can now set alerts for UV and use a smart alarm feature to wake up at the optimal time. Very handy.

Microsoft’s approach to personal health has changed recently with the shuttering of the MSN Health & Fitness app, and I’m hoping that they bulk up their new Microsoft Health offering with more of the smart insights we were promised – but I’ll save that discussion for another day… hopefully when the long awaited universal version of the app comes out for the Windows 10 desktop. It’s soon, right?

Microsoft Band 2

Using the Microsoft Band has helped me get fitter and feel healthier. The Band 2 does all of that and packs it all into a better looking and higher quality package.

I recommend it.

Feeling Good with Microsoft Band

Microsoft Band

Like the Fitbit before it, the Microsoft Band is now well and truly part of my everyday life. Thanks to the addition of the exercise tracking and the Guided Workouts I have seen some tremendous improvements in my health and fitness since strapping the device to my wrist for the first time two months ago.

I have seen an increase in the number in the steps I do and a huge increase in the amount of time I spend exercising every day. At the same time I have measured a decrease in my weight, and my average blood pressure is a little bit lower too. Most importantly I feel better.

I’ve always been driven by these kinds of statistics and throughout my life I have found that mindfulness is always a key driving factor in making improvements to myself. The Band gives me that health mindfulness on a new level, though the motivation to be better is all my own.

Microsoft Health

Positive results aside, I have some notes on a more technical level to share:

And finally I have one more point, which is probably the most important, when you think about it. It isn’t accurate when measuring lower heart rates. In some situations it literally doubles the reading I’m getting through another device – and this is usually when I’m very relaxed or sleeping. I have tweeted Microsoft, but they haven’t replied.

I’m sure the accuracy of the lower heart rates will improve in time, so I’m not too concerned about it. I do look forward to seeing the kind of insights we were promised when the device first came out, as well as web access to the data. I’m sure it’s coming soon.

One Week with Microsoft Band

I have now had the Microsoft Band for one week, and it actually feels like I’ve had it for longer. This is usually a very good sign for any new technology, and I thought I’d share my experiences so far. This isn’t a review as such, this is just my findings on how the Band fits into my lifestyle right now.

Microsoft Band and Microsoft Lumia

First of all, I got the large version of the Band. When it’s at its tightest fitting it’s very snug on my wrist. This gives me a little extra room to loosen it up if I wish, however I find that it’s perfectly comfortable when nice and tight. After a long session of exercise my skin tends to be more sensitive in general, and I notice the device more. This is no different to how I used my G-Shock, and in fact I’d go so far as to say that I notice it about as much.

The times I really notice it most are when the rubber catches on the sleeve of my shirt, or I forget that I’m wearing it and I put my hand in a drawer or a bag and knock the device. This is no different to wearing a large watch really, so I’m not complaining, but this is a large device and I do notice it throughout the day – just like my G-Shock.

Band

Talking of my G-Shock, I’ve decided to wear my Band on my left wrist in the position that used to be reserved for my favourite timepiece. The difference here is that the screen is on the inside. This is by far the best position for the screen when checking your heart rate or time elapsed when doing any kind of exercise, and was the correct decision for a fitness-focussed device like this.

As well as replacing my watch, the Band has also replaced my Fitbit. I used my Fitbit One to passively track statistics like steps throughout the day. The Band does this and seems to have approximately the same accuracy as the Fitbit. I only have these two devices to compare against each other, and the Fitbit seems to be consistently higher by a couple of hundred steps every day – this may be a false tracking of car journeys. I’m not sure.

The Band also supports more active statistics like actual exercise. This is one of the things I used to do though MSN Health & Fitness on my Windows phone. Now I don’t even need to take my phone on my run, and I still get even better statistics than I did before. Effectively, the Band has replaced two hardware devices I always carried and two apps I always used for tracking exercise.

As well as running (hiking and walking) you can also track other more generic exercise workouts. This is great for recording time, calories and heart rate for strength workouts, or anything where you’re not running.

Microsoft Health

At the moment, there’s no specific exercise tracking mode for things like cycling. This isn’t something I’m doing right now, so I’m not too bothered. However, the Microsoft Health software offers a number of guided workouts which can be selected to help you exercise over multiple days. Currently I’m using a 5K training workout which uses interval running to get up to a 5K run in 14 days.

And here we get to the really important part. The Microsoft Health software is new. Very new. Probably so new it lacks features that I’ve come to expect – for example there is no way of viewing my statistics online without using the app.
In time this will change and Microsoft Health will support more exercises, better ways to access the data, synchronisation with HealthVault and much more. In many ways the Microsoft Band is just a way for Microsoft to get data into their new health platform, and Band 2.0 will no doubt be out before too long.

Finally, to prove that the software is lacking features, I haven’t yet found a way to use the galvanic skin response or skin temperature sensors. They are in the hardware, but there is no way to access the data through the software. Yet.

So far my experience has been very positive and I’m looking forward to seeing what comes from unlocking the Band hardware and expanding the Health software in the near future.