Zebra Sharbo X ST3

A couple of weeks ago a friend of mine got back from Japan with a very healthy supply of stationery, and I was fortunate enough to receive a number of shiny new pens and pencils to try out. (Thanks Jordan!)

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The Zebra Sharbo X ST3 was one of these gifts, and I quickly decided it had to be the first I would write about.

I have already been using a Sharbo X LT3 for the last six months, so I know how great the Sharbo X line of multi-pens pens can be. Of course, I was not disappointed.

The beautiful glossy-white painted finish is different to my standard choice of black, and having something out of the ordinary has made this pen stand out even more as one of my favourites.

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All Sharbo X multi-pens can be filled with compatible D1 refills ranging from gel, ball point, emulsion and pencil and stylus. The ST3 is in the same price range and extremely similar to the LT3. There are a few differences though:

  • The ST3 is thicker than the LT3, though this isn’t necessarily a bad thing as I’ll discuss below
  • The threading in the ST3 is plastic, compared to the brass in the LT3
  • The logos and labels on the barrel have a slightly different style
  • The clip joins to the barrel in a slightly different way

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The thicker body may mean that it probably fits a wider variety of D1 refills – when I first got my LT3 the thickest of my refills actually scraped on the inside of the barrel.

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Above you can see how the side of the LAMY refill has rubbed off inside the LT3 (front), and it seems that the ST3 (back) will not have this problem.

I also have a feeling that the thicker barrel will allow me to write for longer periods of time. The LT3 is a bit skinny for extended use, and over time I noticed that it is less comfortable to use than my Jetstream Prime, even though there are only a couple of millimetres difference in the circumference.

For my refills, I have gone for the same setup as a my LT3:

  • Position I: 0.5 mm B Nano-Dai Lead
  • Position II: Black 0.7 mm Jetstream
  • Position III: LAMY Orange Highlighter

Overall I’m thrilled with this pen and it has already made its way into my all-time favourites. For the moment I am using it in place of my LT3, but I am not sure which one I will use as my daily pen moving forward. As they’ve both got the same setup I can easily swap between them or keep them in different bags.

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Pros

  • Sturdy construction and no rattle
  • Standard D1 refills with the trademark Sharbo twist selection
  • Great pencil implementation with lead width selection, knock, and eraser
  • Feels incredibly well made and expensive
  • Beautiful white finish

Cons

  • Not the cheapest multi-pen body, your budget may vary
  • D1 refills are small and don’t hold much ink, especially gels
  • You cannot swap the pencil out for another component
  • Thicker than a standard pen
  • The white finish can be an ink magnet!

Follow @desk_of_jules on Instagram for more stationery photos!

More Stationery Photos on Instagram

My stationery addiction is a big part of my life – of course the whole point is to be productive, but it often looks gorgeous too.

I have decided to create an account on Instagram purely for the purpose of sharing more photographs and information about the stationery I love and use every day. Check it out if stationery is your thing!

Follow @desk_of_jules on Instagram.

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Sony MDR-100ABN Headphones

MDR-100ABN

I listen to audio through headphones for a large portion of my day and I have done so for many years. I am sure other people around my age are the same way.

Growing up with the Walkman and then the iPod or Zune, in my case, has got us so used to having our own soundtrack, that sometimes it feels strange not to have music available. Forgetting to bring my headphones with me can be very frustrating…

When thinking about it, I can essentially split my earphone use into two main situations:

  • Indoors or working at a desk
  • Outdoors or in public places

Traditionally, I had only used in-ear headphones but when I moved into a new home office, I decided to try some over-ear headphones specifically for use around the flat. I’d continue to keep using my in-ear headphones for use outdoors or in public places.

I decided to get some fairly cheap Sony Bluetooth headphones (DR-BTN200M) to see if this design worked for me. Generally, I was really happy with the style of headphone, but I decided it was time to invest in something a bit more substantial.

Sony MDR-100ABN

I spent a lot of time looking around at the various options in the market and a month ago I settled on the Sony MDR-100ABN h.ear on Wireless Over-Ear Headphones with Noise Cancellation in Charcoal Black.

There were a number of qualities I took into consideration, and I’ll go through each one in turn:

  • Comfort
  • Practicality
  • Freedom
  • Audio quality
  • Noise isolation

MDR-100ABN

Comfort

Compared to my previous headphones, the MDR-100ABN has a larger earpads that are made with better materials. The top part of the band also includes an area with this same padding – which is most welcome for people like myself who do not have too much padding of our own on top.

The metal construction makes them heavier than my previous headphones, but I have found the weight is not an issue for me and I am able to wear them for hours without discomfort.

Practicality

As I use them at home, I did not need to go for the smaller in-ear style headphone I have primarily used for years.

Having a larger device means there is plenty of room for the battery. It lasts a long time on a full charge – though I will freely admit I have not taken the effort to time how long it takes for them to run down to empty. They just seem to work for multiple days when I need them to, so I am happy with this.

Even if the battery runs out, it doesn’t matter since a standard 3.5 mm audio cable can be used in place of Bluetooth. This was something I knew I wanted and was a factor in choosing this model. It means that I can travel with these headphones safe in the knowledge that I can still use them without access to a power socket.

My only complaint is that it does not seem to implement Bluetooth multipoint. According to the instructions, you can pair it with multiple devices, but it does not support simultaneous connections like other Bluetooth headsets do. This is not a deal-breaker for me, but it I would have appreciated it.

Freedom

Bluetooth connectivity means I can use them with my Surface while I am at my desk without worrying about being tangled up in cables. Being able to walk from my desk to the kitchen without unplugging helps me stay focused on the task.

In fact, the Bluetooth connection will go from my office to every other room in my flat. Bluetooth isn’t perfect though, as the further away from my office I go the more likely it is that the audio will break up. Breaking up over long distances is pretty normal though, so I’m quite happy with the performance in this regard.

Audio Quality

I do not think I have the correct vocabulary to offer an expert assessment of the audio quality on the MDR-100ABN headphones. Nor do I have I have access to any other contemporary headphones in order to form a fair comparison… but they sound excellent to me!

They certainly have a better sound than my previous over-ear headphones and my current in-ear headphones. The fact they have fantastic noise isolation also seems to improve the general quality.

Noise Isolation

I often see users of more traditional earphones put the volume really high in order to cover the sound of their environment – but this can result in audio distortion and damage to hearing. Since my first pair of isolating in-ear headphones, I have understood the value of blocking out external noise so that the music can be enjoyed without distraction while still being used at lower volumes.

This time I wanted more than noise isolation, I wanted to have the option of active noise cancellation too – so I only considered headphones with the feature included.

The MDR-100ABN’s large earpads isolate a good amount of external noise, and then microphones on the outside of the cups then record the external environment which in turn is processed so that it can cancel out the sound waves going into your ear. The effect here is extremely good and I can use the MDR-100ABN to listen to music on relatively low volumes without hearing background noise like fans, air conditioning, washing machines, or even neighbours watching TV or talking loudly.

I already live in a fairly quiet place, but one of the side effects is that even the faintest noise, like doors shutting or cars parking, can become a distraction. All of that is gone when using these MDR-100ABN’s active noise cancellation, even without playing music.

MDR-100ABN

Final Thoughts

The Sony MDR-100ABN are fantastic headphones and I’m really pleased I have them and the two year warranty means I can be sure that they’ll last.

They are perfect for use at home when writing software and the noise cancellation works well with my favourite productivity music as a way to reduce distractions and stay comfortable for hours.

That is why I got these headphones, and they fit the purpose well.

It’s worth mentioning that I will continue to use in-ear headphones for outdoor use; I do feel comfortable using the MDR-100ABN while walking around in public, even though Sony show people using them this way in their advertising material. I may change my mind over time, but until then I still need to have at least one other set of earphones for use in other scenarios.

Right now, the reality is that I have two additional sets of in-ear headphones that I use regularly with my phone – wired and wireless – bringing my total count of headphones in regular use to three.

I will certainly be looking towards having similar noise cancelling features for my smaller headphones in the future and the minimalist in me would love to consolidate them even further… but I don’t think the technology is really where I want it to be. Most in-ear noise cancelling headphones require an external processing unit, which makes them less portable in general.

I believe we’re actually on the cusp of a number of cool audio technologies and I hope to see tiny in-ear devices with real time audio processing and noise cancelling built in. I can imagine having a system like this with spatially aware audio and the ability to move between sources securely and seamlessly… but we’re clearly still a number of years away.

Until then, I will stick to my three sets of headphones, with the MDR-100ABN as my favourite of the bunch, even if I only use them at home.

Xbox 360 Ends Production

This week Microsoft has announced that it has stopped production of Xbox 360 consoles after a little over 10 years. The Xbox 360 has been an extremely useful machine for me, and formed an integral part of my computing life.

J Allard

I closely watched the development of the 360 back in 2005 (I was a bit of a fan of J Allard too) but I didn’t make the purchase until a year after the original release of the console.

My first Xbox 360 was the Premium version. It was white and huge with a very loud fan. I actually didn’t time my investment all that well as a slightly upgraded Elite version came out soon after I got mine, but they all supported the same software so it didn’t matter all that much.

Original Xbox 360 Dashboard

Back then the 360’s operating system was very different to the one we have today. The original Dashboard included different colour blades which you navigated through left and right to find the section you wanted. I mostly used it to play Xbox Live Arcade games like Geometry Wars, as well as some of the more blockbuster titles such as Gears or War and Crackdown.

I used a VGA cable to connect the Xbox directly to desktop computer monitor – so I was either using my PC or using my Xbox which meant I often ended up using video and entertainment apps in a window while multi-tasking on the PC and the Xbox 360 usage dwindled.

In 2012 I switched around my computing platform in general and essentially replaced my desktop computer with an Xbox 360 S model. It was way quieter than my original Xbox 360 and has been the only thing plugged into my living room screen since then. (I don’t actually watch any broadcast, cable, or satellite television.)

Over the years the software has seen a huge amount of updates too. The current version is such a long way from the original that it’s quite impressive to think how far the device has come.

Current Xbox 360 Dashboard

I still use my 360 pretty much every day when I am at home. Over the years the main use of the console has changed and now it is mostly used to watch video on Netflix or listen to music on Groove.

Most of the time I just use the media remote which is able to turn on my TV, change the volume, and control the 360 software all without using a controller. Essentially my Xbox 360 has become a Roku – with the option of playing games when I want to.

This year I plan on replacing the 360 with an Xbox One. There are plenty of games I want, but the general improvements to the software and user interface are enough to make a noticeable difference to how I get my entertainment. The coming addition of universal Windows apps means that (hopefully) more Windows applications will run directly on the console.

I won’t lose anything with the upgrade either, as most 360 games are backwards compatible with the Xbox One.

Currently I plan on moving over to the Xbox One after this years Electronic Entertainment Expo. Who knows, there may be some new hardware innovations on the way…

Sunrise at South Shields

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