KeySmart

I recently moved into a new flat, and so I got a new set of keys to get into the building. This time, both of them are the flat key type rather than the mixture of types I had previously. This gave me an idea.

In the past, I’ve seen people on EDC websites use all sorts of key organisers, and I thought I’d give it a go. There are a lot out there – so I’d recommend having a good look around, but I decided that the KeySmart would be a safe choice for me. I only have two keys and I am not too worried about having anything super hard-wearing like titanium.

With the KeySmart you get two scales, a number of washers (depending on which model you get), a loop for attaching to other keys, and screws to hold it all together.

I’ve only had it set up like this for a few weeks now, so I haven’t found out if there are any other issues (for example, I never want it to come apart and lose my keys). But in the time I’ve had it, I have been very happy.

KeySmart

I’m not in a rush, but I have been tempted to get some keys with a black finish cut especially for this. Think that would look good?

Pros

  • Way cooler than normal keys, obviously
  • Great for avoiding the jingle when running
  • Super slim profile and feels good in the hand

Cons

  • The Utili-Key I used to keep with me doesn’t really work
  • Lack of jingle means I have to really check I have my keys on me
  • Not as speedy for one handed use, but ok

Productivity Music

When listening to an episode of Cortex on Relay.fm, Myke Hurley and CGP Grey talked about how they use music to get in the zone for productivity. It really resonated with me as I’ve done the same thing for many years, and one of my albums of choice was actually mentioned by Grey.

Get into the zone, work harder, associate similar tasks with the music.

There are two main benefits of doing this: one is to distract the part of the brain which is looking for distractions, and the other is to provide a familiar experience and link it with the act of getting things done.

All Day

All Day is name of the epic 2010 mashup album from Girl Talk which is needs to be experienced in order to be understood. Essentially, it’s a huge number of small snippets from loads of pieces of popular music, all smashed together in one cohesive mashup mega mix spectacular, but you’d have to listen to it to see what I mean.

Girl Talk

I use All Day and Girl Talk’s other albums (all available for free) to get myself into the zone for being productive when writing, scripting and power coding, especially when I want to feel pumped up and full of energy.

The only word of warning is that it may be a bit too distracting if you’re not familiar with the album, as you may end up trying to work out where the samples are coming from rather than concentrating on your work. I’ve been listening to this album since it came out, so a lot of the lyrics are just noise to me now.

Not only was this album mentioned on Cortext, it was also discussed on Inquisitive.

Music to Code By

Music to Code By is not an album of music. It is a productivity tool. It will help you focus intently on any task.

Developed by Carl Franklin (of .NET Rocks! fame) specifically for software developers, Music to Code By (MTCB) has been crafted to provide an easy way for the listener to get into the Flow.

Carl Franklin

The melodic loops are around 50 to 80 BPM and 25 minutes long, which is perfect for me to use as a timer without actually watching the clock. After the track finishes, I get up and go for a short walk before putting on the next track. I use this all the time, especially when I want to calmly read specifications, work through tasks, design software architecture and focus on complex problems.

MTCB isn’t free, but you can get samples from Carl’s website and order from there. I currently only have the first three tracks, but another compilation will be released soon. My favourite track is Blue.

Waking Up with Light

I like to keep a pretty fixed schedule for my days so that I can be as productive as possible. In the winter I find it especially hard to get up in the dark mornings, and traditionally I have just forced myself to wake up using alarms.

For the last 3 months I have been using a Philips Wake-Up Light Alarm Clock to help me wake get out of bed with a more positive attitude.

Philips Wake-Up Light Alarm Clock

I used to have an alarm on my phone set for 06:30 every day, but now I have the light alarm set for 06:00. It actually turns on at 05:30 and gradually brightens over half an hour. I usually wake up before the light reaches its full luminosity, and I’m fully awake and ready to go before 06:30 without feeling like I have been rudely awoken.

Unfortunately I had to make a modification to the alarm to get it to work the way I actually wanted. Because I got the least expensive version, it didn’t include any options for changing the alarm sound. I don’t understand why this alarm has such an annoying, loud, high pitched beep for something which is meant to wake you more naturally.

Why did Philips add an annoying beep to an alarm that is meant to wake you naturally? Totally bizarre.

Anyway, using my Leatherman I cut open the alarm and removed the offending speaker. Now the light comes on in the morning and automatically stays on for two hours before switching itself off. No interaction required. (And yes, I could have done a better job at opening it up, but I can’t stress how annoying the beep is…)

I’m really pleased with it now, though there is definitely room for improvement. Philips do make a number of other models in the range, however a lot of them include features like radio that I don’t care for. I’ll certainly be looking at using this method to wake from now on – especially in the winter months.