Uni-ball Air

Last month, I was in my local Tesco and decided to have a look around the stationery section on the off chance that there was something of interest.

I was extremely surprised to see a new, unfamiliar Uni-ball pen, since I’m pretty up-to-date on the latest products from the Mitsubishi Pencil Company. I don’t know how I missed this one, it has even appeared on a couple of the stationery blogs earlier this year.

Uni-ball Air in Tesco

In my defence, the usual places I look for brand new Uni-ball pens are Mitsubishi Pencil’s Japanese website and on Jetpens, a US based reseller specialising in Japanese pens. At time of writing this, the Japanese website still didn’t have it (they just announced they’ll be available in Japan starting 26th of November 2015) and neither does Jetpens. Yet.

uni-air

The Uni-ball Air is a liquid ink rollerball pen with a unique tip. The tip has stainless steel on the inside and is surrounded by a black plastic that gives it a distinct look and seems to flex with pressure, enabling the pen to write at more angles than the similarly-inked Uni-ball Eye series. The advertising says that the tip gives a similar feel to a fountain pen (without the leaks), because you can get an effect where the line changes in thickness, depending how you hold it.

uni-air-close

The tip has stainless steel on the inside, but it’s surrounded by a black plastic which gives it a distinctive look and also seems flex with pressure, enabling the pen to write at more angles than the similarly-inked Uni-ball Eye series of pens.

uni-use

The thick black line has turned out to be a very good pairing with the Workshop Companion edition of Field Notes. I have enjoyed using it for sketching diagrams on large A4 pages, but for my usual daily note taking activities, I’m going to be continuing to use my 0.7 mm Jetstream Prime for now. I love Jetstream ink too much to give it up.

The Uni-ball Air has made it into my pencil case and will be used as an option whenever I want to use this kind of ink. However, I hope to acquire a thinner version in the not-too-distant future, so that I might have more opportunities to use it.

uni-air-comaprison

By the looks of it, the version you get in the US is actually thinner and, in my opinion, better looking. I’m not keen on the stripes they’ve given us in Europe. Why are they even different?

I find it interesting that it came out in the US and Europe first. In fact the slogan they’ve been using on all of their international sites is “West meets east“. It certainly seems like it was released in the West first, for some reason.

Pros

  • Interesting and unique tip design
  • Variance in line thickness
  • Super smooth writing
  • Uni-ball’s secure ink

Cons

  • Liquid ink is not ideal for all uses
  • Only seems to come in medium/broad in the UK
  • Not thrilled by the stripy look of the barrel

As a final thought, I’d like to say that I’m pleased to see Uni-ball are still innovating. They are my favourite pen and pencil manufacturer and I often worry about their lack of new designs in rollerballs and ballpoints. I’m essentially using the same type of ink refill I was using almost a decade ago. The Air feels like something different to their existing line-up, and that’s good.

Update

The Uni-ball Air is now listed on the Japanese website, and it looks like they have the same designs. The broad ‘stripy’ version, and the cooler black version. The black version is shown with ‘micro‘ branding on the side, and is 0.5 mm. Hopefully I’ll be able to get one soon!

Microsoft Future Vision 2015 – Redux

Back in April I wrote about the latest ‘Future Vision’ video from Microsoft and I was very pleased to see this video come back onto my radar.

Dave Jones and Anton Andrews

Larry Larsen at Channel 9 posted an interview with Dave Jones and Anton Andrews – a couple of the guys who worked on creating this fantastic (yet realistic) vision of the future.

Dave and Anton give us some context on the decisions and thoughts behind the various ideas, including a few extra details about my favourite concepts – the flexible digital notebook and the wrist device.

Future Vision

It’s well worth watching if you are interested in these forward looking concepts, but make sure you watch the Future Vision video first!

Something I had missed when watching the original video was the idea that the system itself had noticed Kat had gone into a flow state. The suggestion here is that the various devices would work together, taking sensor information like heart rate and galvanic skin response, to automatically switch into this mode.

Automatic Mode Switching

The system would then automatically block out any unwanted distractions like notifications and set her communication status to do not disturb.

A nice touch is that the earpiece also switches to red to show other human beings. Very cool.

In The Flow State

As a software architect and technology enthusiast I find myself bombarded with huge amounts of information – communication requests, push notifications, reminders, and much more.

Getting myself into the flow state is hard enough (music helps) but keeping it can be even more difficult. The idea of having the system automatically sense this and move things into a ‘do not disturb’ state is very attractive.

An important part of these Future Vision videos is that they are realistic, and all of this could be done today:

  • Notice high amounts of use in productivity apps (Office, Visual Studio)
  • Sense physical changes in the user (Band)
  • Set ‘Quiet Hours’ for notifications (Windows)
  • Change status to ‘Do Not Disturb’ (Skype)
  • Handle exceptions that can break through (Cortana)

Microsoft controls each one of those components, but the fact is that the most futuristic part of these videos is not the hardware or the software – it’s the integration.

Considering Microsoft reaffirmation as the productivity company, it’s probably something they should try to integrate in order to achieve their goal.