What’s in your bag? 2016

I’ve always been a fan of these kinds of posts so every couple of years I do an update of what I keep in my work bag and what I have as my every day carry:

Knomo Kilkenny

The Bag

The bag itself a messenger bag designed for “11 inch laptops” by Knomo. I’ve had a look and it appears that it is now discontinued but it’s still going strong for me.

I got it back in 2014 to use with my Surface Pro 2. In my original post I speculated that “it will hopefully last even longer than the technology it will hold.” and I was right. It’s a perfect fit the Surface Book too.

I usually wear it just on one shoulder when going short distances but it it works fine across my body too. Previously I’d had larger backpacks for work, but these days the stuff I carry is so small and light that a messenger bag is the best option and just using one shoulder doesn’t cause any physical issues for me.

Surface Book

The main compartment of the bag is used by whichever Surface Book I am using at the time; I have one for work and another one for personal use.

The Surface Book is a beautiful machine and way better than the clunky and huge Dell or HP laptops I used to use for work.

It’s worth mentioning here that I do not carry a power adaptor with me by default. I have Surface power adaptors both in my home office and at work, plus the battery life is just fine for most situations where I am out and using the machine for work.

What's in your bag?

Notebooks

The middle compartment sometimes gets used for other things, but mostly it is where I carry my notebooks.

As a huge stationery nerd I often try out new pens and pencils – but one certainty is that I’ll have my Arts & Science leather case containing my Hobonichi, Field Notes, and whatever my pen of choice is at the moment.

Analogue Note-Taking

Check out my analogue note-taking setup for 2016 for more information on the setup I had at the start of the year, or follow me on Instagram if stationery is your thing.

Analogue and Digital Pens

In the front compartment there are a couple of pen slots – at the moment it is currently holding:

  • Surface Pen
  • Zebra Sharbo X ST3

While the Surface Pen has a magnet to clip to the side of the device, I find that I prefer to keep it in it’s own place when I am storing it in my bag. I don’t want there to be any chance of it falling off and scratching the laptop.

The Sharbo X is probably my favourite multi-pen and I use it a lot when taking notes in meetings. It’s really handy to keep this one in my bag so I have a pen, pencil, and highlighter to hand at all times.

small-items

Small Accessories

Finally, there are also a small number of other miscellaneous items I carry in a zipped pocket:

  • Small USB Cable
  • USB Type C adapter
  • micro SD card and USB adapter
  • Pen knife
  • Cleaning cloth

And that’s it! I really love how much lighter my bag is compared to previous years.

More Stationery Photos on Instagram

My stationery addiction is a big part of my life – of course the whole point is to be productive, but it often looks gorgeous too.

I have decided to create an account on Instagram purely for the purpose of sharing more photographs and information about the stationery I love and use every day. Check it out if stationery is your thing!

Follow @desk_of_jules on Instagram.

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One Year of Field Notes

My first Field Notes notebook

It was one year ago today that I started using my first Field Notes notebook.

It all started with a pack of three “Pitch Black” dot-grid memo books while I was on holiday. I’d heard such good things about these small, creative, and well-designed notebooks. I wanted to try them out!

The first book took me quite a while to finish but after a while I got more comfortable with using them for anything I wanted to write down.

After that I was hooked and I signed up for the Field Notes COLORS subscription service. Through this service the good folk over at Field Notes HQ in Chicago, Illinois will send fresh designs to me on a quarterly basis.

One year of Field Notes notebooks

Over the year I have used 22 notebooks and enjoyed each one in their own way.

I have used a mixture of stock editions, COLORS editions, collaborations, and rarer limited editions. Some of my favourite designs have been produced by the Field Notes creator and well-known designer Aaron James Draplin.

Stack of Field Notes notebooks

Before using Field Notes I would use larger Moleskine notebooks for things I knew I wanted to keep, and additional loose A4 pages, or Index Cards, or any other kind of random notebook.

Now I have standardised on Field Notes I take a lot more notes, and I keep them all when I’m done. They’re well integrated into my Analogue Note-Taking System too, so I always have them with me.

As the notebooks are a great size at 3½″ × 5½″ and 48 pages, they feel like they can just be used for anything. I don’t worry about folding them over or stuffing them in my pocket; they’re special but not too special to use. They’re just right.

You can read a little more about why I like Field Notes in this post from June 2015, but essentially I find them to have great physical dimensions and they only look better after being used. The many variations keep me interested and encourages me to write things down regularly.

Used Field Notes notebooks

Here are the editions I have used in this first year:

  1. Pitch Black
  2. Unexposed (Orange and Blue)
  3. Two Rivers
  4. Cold Horizon
  5. Expedition
  6. Drink Local (India Pale Ale)
  7. Cherry Wood
  8. National Crop (Cotton)
  9. Raven’s Wing
  10. Red Blooded
  11. America the Beautiful (Spacious Skies)
  12. Shenandoah (Sweet Birch)
  13. Workshop Companion (Plumbing)
  14. DDC Factory Floor (Simple-Minded Silver Streak)
  15. Shelterwood
  16. Landland Dead Print
  17. XOXO Festival 2015
  18. DDC Dead Print
  19. County Fair (Texas)
  20. Snowblind
  21. National Crop (Soybeans)
  22. Original Kraft

Field Notes Original Kraft

It wasn’t deliberate but I find it funny that the last book I started in the year was the most generic edition you can get*.

* Though I am sure fellow Field Nuts will notice the lack of the ® symbol on this notebook – it was printed in 2012, before they registered the trademark.

Follow @desk_of_jules on Instagram for more stationery photos!

Analogue Note-Taking System for 2016

For 2016, I have changed my analogue note taking system for the first time since I started using two Moleskine notebooks in 2012.

The centre of my 2016 setup is an Arts & Science leather case for the A6 Hobonichi Techo. I went for the bright option with this vivid orange, a colour which I often link to energy.

It looks absolutely gorgeous and feels great to hold.

hobonichi-case-closed

When closed, the whole kit is a similar size to the dual Moleskine notebooks I used to carry. It’s a little shorter and wider, but generally, they feel to be around the same size in terms of having something to carry around.

leather-sitching-closeup

One of the benefits of using this case is that the whole thing zips up to keep the notebooks inside, nice and safe. This means that, rather than carrying two Moleskine notebooks and a pencil case, I can now just carry the single case with me every day.

Right now, I have the following items inside:

  • 2016 Hobonichi Techo (A6, Japanese)
  • Two Field Notes Notebooks (XOXO Conference 2015, DDC Dead Print)
  • Seven note cards (one currently used)
  • Bookmark (a thankyou card from Landland)
  • Arts & Science Pencil Board
  • A Minecraft sticker I acquired last week

knolling1

This is simply a snapshot of time at the start of 2016 while writing this article. The items inside will change over the year, with the Field Notes changing at least monthly. Most times I’ll only have one Field Notes, but there’s a lot going on at the start of this year so I’ve started with two.

hobonichi-case-open

Opening up the case reveals the notebooks inside. The Hobonichi Techo is on the right hand side, easy to open and look things up. I usually take it out when I’m going to be at a desk for hours, but I can also write and review various things directly in the notebook when it is still in the case.

I will write some more about the Hobonichi Techo in a couple of weeks, but I mostly use this for time-based planning and daily journaling, rather than some of the more creative uses that the notebook is famous for.

I do like to customise the outside though, and both sides are covered in stickers.

inside-pocket

I fell in love with Field Notes in 2015 and now I use them for just about anything. If I have only one Field Notes notebook with me, then I tend to put it in the left hand pocket as above. Since I am using two at the moment, I tend to just put them inside rather than stuffing the pocket.

band-of-rubber-close-up

I also like to have a Band of Rubber on hand for if I need to hold them together.

Anything goes in these notebooks. I burn through these books faster than anything else, and mostly they’re used to record current thoughts, plans and help support my longer term goals.

note-cards

The pocket on the left also includes a couple of card slots. I use them with some blank, white note cards that are used for rough notes, ideas, and pretty much anything that I used to use index cards for – just in a smaller form factor. I don’t like to tear pages out of my Field Notes, so this is what I use if I need take a note for somebody else.

I’ll write some more about my use of these cards soon, but I find that this form factor is much more useful to me than index cards. They easily fit in a wallet too.

note-closeup

On the right, there’s a slot for a pen, and my current pen of choice is the Jetstream Prime (single version – I reviewed the multipen version a while back) with a 0.7 mm black refill. This has become by far my favourite go-to pen of choice, so it gets the pride of place here.

both-cases

Obviously, I am a huge stationery nerd and I can’t just have one pen, so I still keep a main pencil case, which I also carry if I’m using my work bag or something similar. It’s an optional extra though, so it’s not always with me.

This is also a snapshot in time, but here is what’s inside right now:

knolling2

The Kuru Toga is favourite of mine and it still gets plenty of regular use. I’ve also found myself using the Uni-ball Air with large sheets of A4 to work my way through some ideas I have. I find it to be much more enjoyable than a Jetstream when working on a bigger scale or sketching rather than writing.

bb-8-drawing

Most of the other items in my pencil case are going to change fairly regularly. I like to try new things so I often put pens or pencils in here for me to experiment with on a whim. An example is the Field Notes No 2 pencil: it has been there for a couple of weeks, but I simply have not used it yet.

knolling3

There are a few other extras I often tend to use. A cotton bag for the Arts & Science Hobonichi case, a DDC Stuff Sheath, and a Field Notes Band of Rubber – just in case.

hobonichi-case-and-stuff-sheath

I regularly use the DDC Stuff Sheath when just carrying a single Field Notes notebook with me. It’s a fantastic little leather sheath that can be used for anything, but easily fits a couple of Field Notes and other loose materials.

I have this on hand when I need it and often carry it with the Arts & Science leather case for my Hobonichi. They make a great pair.

way-durable-very-orange

Like the pencil case, it’s an optional extra, but it’s most helpful when I am travelling or visiting somewhere and want to take a single notebook out with me.

It’s way durable and very orange.

landland-field-notes

Also worth a mention, is my seemingly never-ending supply of Field Notes notebooks. I keep these at home and choose a different one as soon as I finish the one I’m using. I love working my way through the many designs I have and I’m enjoying each one of the differences in paper and manufacturing techniques.

These are the fundamentals of what I’m planning to use for 2016. It’s quite different to the way I worked before, but I feel that it allows me more flexibility and the ability to write more often with my analogue tools. I feel more connected to analogue note-taking than I ever have.

Follow @desk_of_jules on Instagram for more stationery photos!

Uni-ball Air

Last month, I was in my local Tesco and decided to have a look around the stationery section on the off chance that there was something of interest.

I was extremely surprised to see a new, unfamiliar Uni-ball pen, since I’m pretty up-to-date on the latest products from the Mitsubishi Pencil Company. I don’t know how I missed this one, it has even appeared on a couple of the stationery blogs earlier this year.

Uni-ball Air in Tesco

In my defence, the usual places I look for brand new Uni-ball pens are Mitsubishi Pencil’s Japanese website and on Jetpens, a US based reseller specialising in Japanese pens. At time of writing this, the Japanese website still didn’t have it (they just announced they’ll be available in Japan starting 26th of November 2015) and neither does Jetpens. Yet.

uni-air

The Uni-ball Air is a liquid ink rollerball pen with a unique tip. The tip has stainless steel on the inside and is surrounded by a black plastic that gives it a distinct look and seems to flex with pressure, enabling the pen to write at more angles than the similarly-inked Uni-ball Eye series. The advertising says that the tip gives a similar feel to a fountain pen (without the leaks), because you can get an effect where the line changes in thickness, depending how you hold it.

uni-air-close

The tip has stainless steel on the inside, but it’s surrounded by a black plastic which gives it a distinctive look and also seems flex with pressure, enabling the pen to write at more angles than the similarly-inked Uni-ball Eye series of pens.

uni-use

The thick black line has turned out to be a very good pairing with the Workshop Companion edition of Field Notes. I have enjoyed using it for sketching diagrams on large A4 pages, but for my usual daily note taking activities, I’m going to be continuing to use my 0.7 mm Jetstream Prime for now. I love Jetstream ink too much to give it up.

The Uni-ball Air has made it into my pencil case and will be used as an option whenever I want to use this kind of ink. However, I hope to acquire a thinner version in the not-too-distant future, so that I might have more opportunities to use it.

uni-air-comaprison

By the looks of it, the version you get in the US is actually thinner and, in my opinion, better looking. I’m not keen on the stripes they’ve given us in Europe. Why are they even different?

I find it interesting that it came out in the US and Europe first. In fact the slogan they’ve been using on all of their international sites is “West meets east“. It certainly seems like it was released in the West first, for some reason.

Pros

  • Interesting and unique tip design
  • Variance in line thickness
  • Super smooth writing
  • Uni-ball’s secure ink

Cons

  • Liquid ink is not ideal for all uses
  • Only seems to come in medium/broad in the UK
  • Not thrilled by the stripy look of the barrel

As a final thought, I’d like to say that I’m pleased to see Uni-ball are still innovating. They are my favourite pen and pencil manufacturer and I often worry about their lack of new designs in rollerballs and ballpoints. I’m essentially using the same type of ink refill I was using almost a decade ago. The Air feels like something different to their existing line-up, and that’s good.

Update

The Uni-ball Air is now listed on the Japanese website, and it looks like they have the same designs. The broad ‘stripy’ version, and the cooler black version. The black version is shown with ‘micro‘ branding on the side, and is 0.5 mm. Hopefully I’ll be able to get one soon!