Windows

Microsoft Windows is currently the most popular general purpose operating system for PCs.

Highlights from Build 2015

The Build 2015 conference has just taken place in San Francisco.

Like last year, this has been another huge event for Microsoft, and a big deal for the people who build solutions using their technologies.

There have been way more interesting things happening than I can possibly cover in one article, but I have decided to cover the three most important to me:

.NET, Windows and Azure.

An exciting future for .NET and Open Source

The future of .NET is the continued push to an open source .NET Core, which is at the centre of both the latest ASP.NET runtime and the Universal Windows app platform. In the future, this will expand and include other application types. In my opinion, they’ve picked the right place to start.

Applications running on the CoreCLR can be developed and deployed on cloud and server-based infrastructures running different operating systems including Windows, Linux and OS X. I have been watching the development efforts on GitHub for a while now, and I’ve set it up on my own machines running both Windows and Linux. It sure is a sight to see.

As well as the core runtime itself going open source, other technologies like Roslyn have enabled products that many wouldn’t have guessed would see the light of day. Having an open source compiler platform has enabled Visual Studio Code – a new cross platform text editor with Intellisense – to be built.

I was lucky enough to see Visual Studio Code before it was announced, and it changed the way I thought about collaboration with Mac users instantly. I’ll have more on this new text editor soon.

Visual Studio Code

With the RC of Visual Studio 2015 there have been some big improvements in the languages supported including both the more traditional C# and Visual Basic, and (my personal favourite) F#.

The Visual F# improvements in ‘every day’ activities are dramatic for anyone who has been using the language. This is all thanks to the new open source attitude, and the amazing community around F# who have helped to develop the Visual F# tools on GitHub.

This new world of cross-platform and open source .NET technology is going to enable some amazing scenarios for .NET developers like myself.

Windows 10’s application platform takes shape

The aforementioned Universal Windows app platform is really taking shape now. Gone are the days of very prescriptive (and maybe too forward-looking) design patterns of Windows 8, and in is the ‘do what’s right for your applications‘ model that has been working well for some for a while.

Universal Windows apps scale from the smallest phones and Internet of Things devices up to the large screens of the Xbox One and the Surface Hub. The most ‘universal’ of these apps are built with just one binary which includes a scalable UI. This allows you to even have the ‘desktop’ app experience when used on a landscape 5.7 inch phone, or when plugged into an external screen using an amazing new Continuum for Phones feature.

For app developers there are some interesting (and controversial) new ways for software venders to build for Windows. The biggest of which are the bridges from Android and iOS. These two are extremely important for the phone and work especially well for iOS games which don’t rely too heavily on the operating specific UI elements. Combined with the bridges for ‘classic windows’ apps and websites using Microsoft Edge, the Store should get a lot more apps on this Windows 10 wave of releases.

From a user’s view, Windows 10 has really rounded out, with the latest Insider Preview feeling a lot more polished than any of the previous builds. Seeing HoloLens run standard Windows Universal apps was a big deal too.

I’ll have more thoughts on these in the future as the Insider Preview continues, and more information for HoloLoens is released at E3.

Microsoft <3 Docker and other Azure improvements

Azure, and the Microsoft Cloud in general, continue to amaze me. Microsoft has managed to embrace this new way of building (and selling) software in at breakneck speed. Additional services were added throughout the platform all the way from storage and networking, to analytics and machine learning. Way too many for this article.

Two of the biggest highlights were the ability to run the complete Azure Stack locally, and Azure’s new Data Lake features too, something which Amazon has had a lot of success with.

Microsoft <3 Docker

For me though, the most interesting changes were around Docker support across Windows and Azure. Docker has been on my radar for a while, but I have yet to use it in production. I have plans to do so in the not too distant future.

Holographic Computing is Coming

Microsoft HoloLens

A bit like something out of their Future Vision videos, Microsoft’s Windows Holographic software and HoloLens hardware look to enable many of the augmented reality dreams technologists like myself have been imagining for years.

Truly I’m excited about this platform, and I’m keen to try out the product as soon as I possibly can, but I still have a large amount of questions.

What happens if you put your hand ‘in front’ of a hologram?
If you have a virtual 80 inch TV screen – what resolution does it have?
Can you stream Xbox games to it?
How long does the battery last?
Can other people hear the audio from the speakers located on the side?
How hot is the air that comes out of the vents?
How well does it work with glasses?
Will there be a holographic version of PowerShell?

It may be a while until all our questions are answered, but until then I’m going to simply imagine the possibilities this new form of computing will bring. Check out the videos below and have a look at Microsoft’s website to get an idea of what’s coming.

As someone who is always trying to simplify and keep things minimalistic, I always question new technologies to decide if they’re really worth investing in. One part of my believes I already have enough computing devices, but another part yearns to try new technology and find new ways to interact with the digital world. The HoloLens definitely seems like something I’m going to want to experience.

Will it be a success? Only time will tell. But future versions of the hardware will no doubt be smaller, and have better field of view. One day this kind of thing will simply be built into a normal pair of glasses – but that’s a little way off.

More to come soon.

Initial thoughts on the Windows 10 Technical Preview

Now that the second preview build of the Technical Preview of Windows 10 is out, I decided the time was right to share some of my initial thoughts on this early preview for Windows 10.

Windows 10 Universal Apps

First of all, it’s important to understand that, for casual computer use, I was very happy using Windows 8.1 on my Surface Pro 2, both on the touch screen and when plugged into a monitor, keyboard and mouse. I didn’t just “put up with Windows 8″ like many folk seem to. I embraced it and it changed the way I used a computer.

I embraced Windows 8 and I loved using full-screen apps at home

Simplicity is something I am always striving for. For example, I don’t have any icons on my desktop and I only pin the minimal amount of apps to my taskbar. The majority of the apps I used at home were ‘modern’ full screen apps. This means that I could have Xbox Music playing in the background with no icon in the task bar or any other visible UI unless I have it snapped to the screen. I understand that for some users this was mind-blowingly hard to understand, but I liked the simplicity.

Windows 10 Taskbar

With Windows 10, performing a task, like listening to music, means that there is an icon in the task bar. This is better for the majority of users, but for me it takes some getting used to.

Using Windows 10 is already better for multitasking and getting things done

The first two builds of the Technical Preview have been focused squarely on the experience in the enterprise, and specifically, use with a keyboard and mouse inside of the desktop environment. Here are where things really shine in Windows 10.

Unlike the way I was using full screen Windows 8 apps at home, I use multiple screens and desktop applications when I’m at work. Three screens means I can multi-task between development applications like Visual Studio, SQL Management Studio and PowerShell at the same time, but I still have to minimize and swap windows around when switching to communication and note taking applications like OneNote and Outlook.

Windows 10 Task View

Windows 10 includes some fantastic virtual desktop features which help around this, and I’m really looking forward to running Windows 10 at work. I could use the Task View to switch between these two logical tasks rather than minimising multiple windows.

Unfortunately the Windows team couldn’t get everything done in time for the first preview. The biggest things that are missing for me are around using the touch screen, and modern apps in full screen. The good news is that we do know that future builds will include features like Continuum, that are specifically designed for hybrid computers like the Surface.

Touch screen is still coming, and hopefully it will be as great as the desktop

With two builds already, it seems that the velocity is pretty fast. I’m looking forward to getting my hands on new features. Windows 10 is shaping up to be one of the most important versions of Windows ever – in terms of both the features and the speedy development process.

Windows 10 has an improved Console

Windows 10 Console

It’s true, the Windows command line is making a comeback.

With Windows 10, a number of ‘experimental’ options have been added to the console host which work with both the classic cmd.exe and PowerShell. This includes features like CTRL-C and CTRL-V for copy and paste, plus new text selection hotkeys, resizing, transparency and more.

And, by the looks of Microsoft’s UserVoice forum, this looks like just the beginning:

In the dawn of time, the original Windows console was created. For millenia, geeks and developers (typically both) steeled their nerves and leveraged the console’s utility. After a (very) short time, a great lacking was noticed. And so, legions of ever intrepid command line mavens migrated to other platforms and other consoles, ‘til but a stalwart few remained. Now, today, with a small rumbling, the ancient, weary console heaves a great sigh and rises. The journey to legitimacy has begun.

WE’RE BACK!

If these kinds of features are important to you, don’t forget to give your feedback to Microsoft so that they know that the command line is still relevant in 2014.

Windows 10 Technical Preview

As a big user of software and services in the Microsoft ecosystem, finding out about the next version of Windows is always exciting. Yesterday, we got our first official look at Windows 10, and while we didn’t learn about many features which hadn’t already been leaked, we did finally get to hear Microsoft’s plan for its next generation Windows platform.

Windows 10 Product Family

The official picture above teases how this single release of Windows will feature multiple interfaces the operating system itself, scaling from the Xbox One and the large Perceptive Pixel multi-user business display, all the way down to embedded devices, phones and small tablets.

From a developer point of view, Windows 10 will support a new universal app model that spans across multiple devices. This means that an application can be written only once to run across all of these environments, end-users will only have to purchase the application once to use it everywhere. Universal apps for Windows 10 will probably be very similar to the ones announced at Build earlier this year.

Windows 10 Start Menu

New features like Task View and Snap Assistant are included in the technical preview, but the more obvious user interface changes look like they are still to come. For example, Continuum is a set of features which enable hybrid devices to switch between touch and desktop modes automatically, just by attaching or removing the keyboard.

Windows 10 Task View

Today, along with many other Windows enthusiasts, I signed up for the new Windows Insider Program. This new program is similar in concept to the Windows Phone Developer Preview, but it will also provide opportunities to provide feedback directly to the Windows team.

Trust me, I’m going to provide as much feedback as possible.