Windows

Microsoft Windows is currently the most popular general purpose operating system for PCs.

Holographic Computing is Coming

Microsoft HoloLens

A bit like something out of their Future Vision videos, Microsoft’s Windows Holographic software and HoloLens hardware look to enable many of the augmented reality dreams technologists like myself have been imagining for years.

Truly I’m excited about this platform, and I’m keen to try out the product as soon as I possibly can, but I still have a large amount of questions.

What happens if you put your hand ‘in front’ of a hologram?
If you have a virtual 80 inch TV screen – what resolution does it have?
Can you stream Xbox games to it?
How long does the battery last?
Can other people hear the audio from the speakers located on the side?
How hot is the air that comes out of the vents?
How well does it work with glasses?
Will there be a holographic version of PowerShell?

It may be a while until all our questions are answered, but until then I’m going to simply imagine the possibilities this new form of computing will bring. Check out the videos below and have a look at Microsoft’s website to get an idea of what’s coming.

As someone who is always trying to simplify and keep things minimalistic, I always question new technologies to decide if they’re really worth investing in. One part of my believes I already have enough computing devices, but another part yearns to try new technology and find new ways to interact with the digital world. The HoloLens definitely seems like something I’m going to want to experience.

Will it be a success? Only time will tell. But future versions of the hardware will no doubt be smaller, and have better field of view. One day this kind of thing will simply be built into a normal pair of glasses – but that’s a little way off.

More to come soon.

Initial thoughts on the Windows 10 Technical Preview

Now that the second preview build of the Technical Preview of Windows 10 is out, I decided the time was right to share some of my initial thoughts on this early preview for Windows 10.

Windows 10 Universal Apps

First of all, it’s important to understand that, for casual computer use, I was very happy using Windows 8.1 on my Surface Pro 2, both on the touch screen and when plugged into a monitor, keyboard and mouse. I didn’t just “put up with Windows 8″ like many folk seem to. I embraced it and it changed the way I used a computer.

I embraced Windows 8 and I loved using full-screen apps at home

Simplicity is something I am always striving for. For example, I don’t have any icons on my desktop and I only pin the minimal amount of apps to my taskbar. The majority of the apps I used at home were ‘modern’ full screen apps. This means that I could have Xbox Music playing in the background with no icon in the task bar or any other visible UI unless I have it snapped to the screen. I understand that for some users this was mind-blowingly hard to understand, but I liked the simplicity.

Windows 10 Taskbar

With Windows 10, performing a task, like listening to music, means that there is an icon in the task bar. This is better for the majority of users, but for me it takes some getting used to.

Using Windows 10 is already better for multitasking and getting things done

The first two builds of the Technical Preview have been focused squarely on the experience in the enterprise, and specifically, use with a keyboard and mouse inside of the desktop environment. Here are where things really shine in Windows 10.

Unlike the way I was using full screen Windows 8 apps at home, I use multiple screens and desktop applications when I’m at work. Three screens means I can multi-task between development applications like Visual Studio, SQL Management Studio and PowerShell at the same time, but I still have to minimize and swap windows around when switching to communication and note taking applications like OneNote and Outlook.

Windows 10 Task View

Windows 10 includes some fantastic virtual desktop features which help around this, and I’m really looking forward to running Windows 10 at work. I could use the Task View to switch between these two logical tasks rather than minimising multiple windows.

Unfortunately the Windows team couldn’t get everything done in time for the first preview. The biggest things that are missing for me are around using the touch screen, and modern apps in full screen. The good news is that we do know that future builds will include features like Continuum, that are specifically designed for hybrid computers like the Surface.

Touch screen is still coming, and hopefully it will be as great as the desktop

With two builds already, it seems that the velocity is pretty fast. I’m looking forward to getting my hands on new features. Windows 10 is shaping up to be one of the most important versions of Windows ever – in terms of both the features and the speedy development process.

Windows 10 has an improved Console

Windows 10 Console

It’s true, the Windows command line is making a comeback.

With Windows 10, a number of ‘experimental’ options have been added to the console host which work with both the classic cmd.exe and PowerShell. This includes features like CTRL-C and CTRL-V for copy and paste, plus new text selection hotkeys, resizing, transparency and more.

And, by the looks of Microsoft’s UserVoice forum, this looks like just the beginning:

In the dawn of time, the original Windows console was created. For millenia, geeks and developers (typically both) steeled their nerves and leveraged the console’s utility. After a (very) short time, a great lacking was noticed. And so, legions of ever intrepid command line mavens migrated to other platforms and other consoles, ‘til but a stalwart few remained. Now, today, with a small rumbling, the ancient, weary console heaves a great sigh and rises. The journey to legitimacy has begun.

WE’RE BACK!

If these kinds of features are important to you, don’t forget to give your feedback to Microsoft so that they know that the command line is still relevant in 2014.

Windows 10 Technical Preview

As a big user of software and services in the Microsoft ecosystem, finding out about the next version of Windows is always exciting. Yesterday, we got our first official look at Windows 10, and while we didn’t learn about many features which hadn’t already been leaked, we did finally get to hear Microsoft’s plan for its next generation Windows platform.

Windows 10 Product Family

The official picture above teases how this single release of Windows will feature multiple interfaces the operating system itself, scaling from the Xbox One and the large Perceptive Pixel multi-user business display, all the way down to embedded devices, phones and small tablets.

From a developer point of view, Windows 10 will support a new universal app model that spans across multiple devices. This means that an application can be written only once to run across all of these environments, end-users will only have to purchase the application once to use it everywhere. Universal apps for Windows 10 will probably be very similar to the ones announced at Build earlier this year.

Windows 10 Start Menu

New features like Task View and Snap Assistant are included in the technical preview, but the more obvious user interface changes look like they are still to come. For example, Continuum is a set of features which enable hybrid devices to switch between touch and desktop modes automatically, just by attaching or removing the keyboard.

Windows 10 Task View

Today, along with many other Windows enthusiasts, I signed up for the new Windows Insider Program. This new program is similar in concept to the Windows Phone Developer Preview, but it will also provide opportunities to provide feedback directly to the Windows team.

Trust me, I’m going to provide as much feedback as possible.

Is this the end of HealthVault?

MSN Health & Fitness

As part of the rebranding to MSN, the fantastic Health & Fitness app gained a number of smaller features, and lost one big one: synchronisation to Microsoft’s HealthVault medical data backend.

HealthVault first started back in 2007 in the United States as a medical storage system designed for families to share data with doctors and medical institutions. It expanded in 2010 to include the United Kingdom with grand plans to integrate the service into the UK’s National Health Service. It seems that these grand plans were never realised, as I’ve never been able to get access to my NHS data this way.

HealthVault for Windows Phone

I have been using HealthVault for years though. It’s my central repository for all my health information including steps from my Fitbit, blood pressure, emergency contact details and, until now, calorie intake and exercise statistics from Health & Fitness.

In my opinion, today’s removal of the HealthVault synchronisation is probably for technical reasons, but it may signal the beginning of the end for the service. I can’t imagine Satya’s Microsoft keeping two competing health platforms up and running for long. Especially with new competitors outside of the company from the likes of Apple’s HealthKit and Google Fit.

I was involved in a small private beta of the Health & Fitness app for Windows Phone in an effort to try and reduce the serious amounts of crashing that would occur on the app when tracking exercise with the GPS. It’s also no shock to anyone that has used it that entering information and waiting for it to synchronise was a slow process.

MSN Health & Fitness for Windows Phone

Synchronisation is super-fast on the new Health & Fitness app and the newly designed Azure-powered backend is probably a big factor in that speed, especially when compared to the aging HealthVault platform API.

The diet and cardio information entered into the app is also available on the new MSN portal that launched today. This is also super-fast and responsive. It’s no wonder they’ve made this decision for end users.

Finally, there is a possibility that MSN’s new cloud backend will eventually end up synchronising directly with HealthVault, rather than going through the device-based clients as it used to. But it seems doubtful based on my understanding.

Update

Since writing this article, Microsoft Health has been announced. Microsoft has confirmed that backend data from this new health insights engine will be able to export to HealthVault. I can only assume that MSN’s Health & Fitness data will be updated to feed into Microsoft Health, and eventually into HealthVault. At the moment, this isn’t happening, but I’ll update the post if/when it is up and running.