Introducing Motion Controllers for Windows Mixed Reality

Microsoft have been using gestures like the air tap and bloom when interacting with the HoloLens, but when you’re in a fully occluded VR world, you need to be able to interact with your world without seeing your hands. This is done by using motion controllers, as seen by companies like HTC and Oculus.

Now it’s Microsoft’s turn to show how users are going to interact with the experience provided by Windows Mixed Reality. They are coming later this year and I can’t wait to get my hands on them.

Microsoft have a long history of creating new types of hardware to provide a consistent experience across third party devices. The original Microsoft Mouse was released alongside Windows Word in order to provide a way for users to move their cursor. Like the mouse it is in Microsoft’s interest to allow third parties to create their own motion controllers, but I expect that they’ll all be compatible and have the same technology inside.

Interestingly it seems that Microsoft has decided that they do not need to make these controllers work with the HoloLens – at least not with the existing version. The HoloLens hasn’t seen much in the way of software updates recently, so I won’t rule out the chances of them adding it in the future, but I get the feeling that Microsoft want people to use their hands for that device.

In my opinion we need these controllers for the HoloLens too – the Clicker is not enough… but that’s a story for another time. How do these new controllers work?

Optical Tracking

All of the Windows Mixed Reality headsets provide inside-out tracking – this means that each device will have the sensors required to track the world in the head-mounted display without any additional sensors or tracking devices around the room.

The new Motion Controllers take advantage of this technology to provide six degrees of freedom without any extra wires or mess. This also reduces the complexity of the controller, allowing for a complete tracking solution without being too expensive.

It’s worth mentioning that I assume there is some additional motion tracking in the controllers (so you can put it behind your back, for example), but the truly accurate measurements will be done optically when the headset have a line of sight to the lights around the controller.

Buttons

So what kinds of controls can we expect to have?

  • Windows buttons
  • Menu buttons
  • Trigger buttons
  • Grab buttons
  • Analogue thumbsticks
  • Trackpad surface

Currently, it’s unclear if the trigger and grab buttons are analogue or digital. Analogue buttons would enable the user to gently grab items as well as provide a wide range of trigger actions, much like accelerating in Forza when using an Xbox One controller.

I’m also super interested to know how well the trackpad surface can be used. It seems to have the ability to click, so it can be used much like a primary button too.

Watch the introduction video and see for yourself!

What is Mixed Reality?

I’ve not created a new category for my website for years – but there’s something that I have spending a lot of time working and I need to start writing about: mixed reality.

Mixed reality is a broad umbrella of technologies which enable a real and virtual worlds to be blended together to create a single environment where physical and digital objects interact with each other.

I remember when I was in school I would imagine what it would be like to have a “heads up display” all the time. I’d imagine information that I’d see about people and surroundings, interactive maps giving me directions, reminders about errands I need to run, all sorts of things.

Thanks to science fiction there was no doubt in my mind that it was an inevitability, and it would happen in my life time – but I didn’t really know how or when it would happen.

Fortaleza Leak

Back in 2012 a very interesting image appeared on the internet. It was from an Xbox presentation which mentioned something called Fortaleza Glasses. Rumours of Project Fortaleza had been going for a while, and I followed the subject with great interest.

Linked to Alex Kipman, the creator of the Kinect, it was thought that these glasses would be Microsoft’s move to leap ahead of virtual reality and into some new world of augmented reality. I hope so much that it was true…

HoloLens

..and I remember how amazed I was when I found out it was true.

HoloLens at Home

Well, over the last six months I have not only tried the HoloLens, but spend many hours using it in both professionally and in my home. I’ve been learning how it works, how to develop software for it, and most importantly; I’ve been learning about what it means for the future of software.

This is a whole new kind of user experience, and I believe that mixed reality is the future of how humans will interact with software.

Actiongram

But mixed reality is about experience, not technology. When I say that I believe it is the future of how humans will interact with software – I am not saying that everyone will wear headsets. It won’t be long until there are other ways to project digital items into the physical world.

It breaks down the walls between physical and virtual reality – today this means vision and sound, but the concept of mixed reality goes beyond those senses. As a software architect it excites me to think about the user experiences which everyone in the augmented/virtual/mixed reality community is going to help shape, and I’m to write about what I learn as I go.

Now that I have experienced mixed reality, there’s no going back.

It’s real, it’s getting better all the time, and it’s here to stay.