Full Moon in May 2014

Last night I went out with my Canon SLR to take some nice photos of the moon, but when I got out I discovered my battery was almost flat – and I didn’t manage to get a good shot. But to make up for it, here’s a picture taken with my Lumia 920.

Full Moon in May 2014

Watching Gravity on Xbox Video

I don’t own any movies on DVD or Blu-ray. None at all. I gave up on DVD at the same time I stopped buying CDs, and I have never been interested in getting myself a Blu-ray player for movies either.

Most of the movies I watch are on Netflix, but once in a while a new movie comes along that I want to watch as soon as I can. In previous years there weren’t any decent (legal) ways to do this, but these days there are a number of options for getting movies online.

As a happy user of Xbox Music, I thought I’d give Xbox Video a try.

Xbox Video

Xbox Video is a streaming video service that lets you either rent or purchase movies, and watch them directly on your Xbox, Windows device or in a web browser.

The only video I’ve purchased on Xbox Video previously was Mean Girls – but that’s a 10 year old movie and didn’t include any of the fancy extras you get with SmartGlass.

When Gravity became available I purchased the HD version for £14.99. Because it’s purchased, rather than rented, I can watch it as many times as I want, including the SmartGlass extras.

Gravity

In Gravity, Dr. Ryan Stone is a mission specialist on a Space Shuttle mission to Hubble, when an accident causes the rest of the crew to perish.

In a slightly unrealistic-but-more-realistic-than-most-movies turn of events she finds herself at the International Space Station, then to a Chinese Space Station in an attempt to get back home.

SmartGlass on Windows Phone

Through Xbox SmartGlass you get access to special content – which I believe is also included on the Blu-ray release. I have the option of accessing the extras through either my Windows Phone, or my Surface tablet. There are also apps available for both iOS and Android too, but I don’t have either of those devices.

My favourite part of the extra content was actually the video short, however I couldn’t get it to play full screen for some reason. Bit of a shame.

Xbox SmartGlass

In “Aningaaq”, we see the other end of the radio conversation that Stone has while in the Russian space craft. Aninqaaq, a fisherman in Greenland, is also dealing with death in his own way. This time we are provided with a translation for his side of the conversation, which is a great little extra to the movie.

Overall the Xbox SmartGlass experience was good, and more interesting when I watched the movie for the second time. I don’t think I’ve ever purchased a movie specifically for the extras before, and I’m not going to start – but it’s a good little bonus.

Gravity

Running JAR applications on Windows without installing the Java Virtual Machine

As part of my Open University course, I’m required to use a piece of open source software called Aladin Sky Atlas. This is maintained by Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg.

The program itself is actually pretty cool – it’s an interactive sky atlas, which allows you to view astronomical images along with information from the SIMBAD database and other sources.

The only problem with this program is that it uses Java, something I tend to avoid whenever possible. Installing Java on my Surface Pro 2 would mean I’d have more critical patches to install than I already do, and would open me up to a whole new attack vector. It’s not something I’d want to run on a tablet computer either.

(ノಠ益ಠ)ノ “Eww, Java!”

I originally tried using Hyper-V with a virtual machine running CentOS. This is a nice clean way of having ‘nothing running’ until it’s actually needed, but it’s quite an overhead to run a whole Linux operating system just to host a single app. Especially when battery life is a concern.

When searching around for a solution, I stumbled upon a really cool project that I’d never seen before. The IKVM.NET project includes a number of components for Java & .NET interoperability, but for this task I’m mostly interested in the Java Virtual Machine implementation.

By downloading the Windows binary of IKVM.NET, I’ve been able to run the application on my Windows 8.1 machine without requiring the JVM (or any other software) to be installed at all. This is a pretty fantastic achievement.

First I put the binaries into my apps folder (similar to my Vim setup), then I set up an alias to the executable using PowerShell.

# There's usually much more than this in my profile!
$SCRIPTSPATH  =  "C:\Users\Julian\Scripts"

Set-Alias ikvm   "$SCRIPTSPATH\Apps\ikvm\ikvm.exe"
Set-Alias ikvmc  "$SCRIPTSPATH\Apps\ikvm\ikvmc.exe"

# ikvmc.exe is cool too! have a look

After creating an alias in PowerShell I can just run it whenever I need.

PS> ikvm -jar aladin.jar

Obviously you could always set up a Windows Shortcut that does a similar thing, but that’s boring. Using PowerShell really suites me, as I often run applications this way.

Aladin Sky Atlas running on Windows without Java installed

The software doesn’t exactly look pretty, but these open source projects rarely do. Sometimes it looks like text hasn’t rendered as expected, but overall I’m really impressed.

If you’re looking to run JAR applications on Windows, without the Java Virtual Machine, then have a look at The IKVM.NET – it might work for your apps too.