Windows 10 has an improved Console

Windows 10 Console

It’s true, the Windows command line is making a comeback.

With Windows 10, a number of ‘experimental’ options have been added to the console host which work with both the classic cmd.exe and PowerShell. This includes features like CTRL-C and CTRL-V for copy and paste, plus new text selection hotkeys, resizing, transparency and more.

And, by the looks of Microsoft’s UserVoice forum, this looks like just the beginning:

In the dawn of time, the original Windows console was created. For millenia, geeks and developers (typically both) steeled their nerves and leveraged the console’s utility. After a (very) short time, a great lacking was noticed. And so, legions of ever intrepid command line mavens migrated to other platforms and other consoles, ‘til but a stalwart few remained. Now, today, with a small rumbling, the ancient, weary console heaves a great sigh and rises. The journey to legitimacy has begun.

WE’RE BACK!

If these kinds of features are important to you, don’t forget to give your feedback to Microsoft so that they know that the command line is still relevant in 2014.

Running JAR applications on Windows without installing the Java Virtual Machine

As part of my Open University course, I’m required to use a piece of open source software called Aladin Sky Atlas. This is maintained by Centre de données astronomiques de Strasbourg.

The program itself is actually pretty cool – it’s an interactive sky atlas, which allows you to view astronomical images along with information from the SIMBAD database and other sources.

The only problem with this program is that it uses Java, something I tend to avoid whenever possible. Installing Java on my Surface Pro 2 would mean I’d have more critical patches to install than I already do, and would open me up to a whole new attack vector. It’s not something I’d want to run on a tablet computer either.

(ノಠ益ಠ)ノ “Eww, Java!”

I originally tried using Hyper-V with a virtual machine running CentOS. This is a nice clean way of having ‘nothing running’ until it’s actually needed, but it’s quite an overhead to run a whole Linux operating system just to host a single app. Especially when battery life is a concern.

When searching around for a solution, I stumbled upon a really cool project that I’d never seen before. The IKVM.NET project includes a number of components for Java & .NET interoperability, but for this task I’m mostly interested in the Java Virtual Machine implementation.

By downloading the Windows binary of IKVM.NET, I’ve been able to run the application on my Windows 8.1 machine without requiring the JVM (or any other software) to be installed at all. This is a pretty fantastic achievement.

First I put the binaries into my apps folder (similar to my Vim setup), then I set up an alias to the executable using PowerShell.

# There's usually much more than this in my profile!
$SCRIPTSPATH  =  "C:\Users\Julian\Scripts"

Set-Alias ikvm   "$SCRIPTSPATH\Apps\ikvm\ikvm.exe"
Set-Alias ikvmc  "$SCRIPTSPATH\Apps\ikvm\ikvmc.exe"

# ikvmc.exe is cool too! have a look

After creating an alias in PowerShell I can just run it whenever I need.

PS> ikvm -jar aladin.jar

Obviously you could always set up a Windows Shortcut that does a similar thing, but that’s boring. Using PowerShell really suites me, as I often run applications this way.

Aladin Sky Atlas running on Windows without Java installed

The software doesn’t exactly look pretty, but these open source projects rarely do. Sometimes it looks like text hasn’t rendered as expected, but overall I’m really impressed.

If you’re looking to run JAR applications on Windows, without the Java Virtual Machine, then have a look at The IKVM.NET – it might work for your apps too.

Will Neovim rock on Windows?

Gvim on Windows 8

I have been using Vim on Windows since I switched to 64-bit and edit.com stopped working. Originally I just used the console version inside of PowerShell or the standard command line. In the last three years I’ve been favouring Gvim as my go-to text editor for smaller scripts and utilities.

I know for a fact I’m not using everything Gvim or Vim has to offer, but I’m quite happy with the way it works. For example, I have line numbers turned off, but I can turn them on very easily using a quick :set nu.

Very powerful, very fast.

There are some things I absolutely hate though. For starters, what’s this horrible border on the inside of the window, and how can I make it disappear without hacking the whole application and recompiling it? This isn’t Windows 95.

Ugly Border

I’ve looked for some time but I haven’t found a solution. But hey, I found out that people can make it look pretty on Ubuntu (handy!)

Enter Neovim

Neovim promises to be a refactoring (and reimagining) of the Vim text editor using more modern techniques. The plan is to have the core Vim functionality moved into a new library, which will allow the interfaces to be separated out in a modular way.

The thing that got me really interested? When they mentioned Windows:

Modern GUIs written in high-level programming languages that integrate better with the operating system. We can have GUIs written using C#/WPF on Windows or Ruby/Cocoa on OS X, for example.

True they’re not saying they will write a GUI using C# & WPF, but someone can. And I like the sound of that. Of course, it’ll be open source – and I’ll be able to edit the XAML to have no borders at all, if I like.

Also, here’s hoping we get better PowerShell integration out of this too.

It could be huge.

So, will Neovim rock on Windows? I sure hope so.

Update

I always keep an eye on the Neovim project and recently I though I’d try out the Neovim-QT frontend which actually builds for Windows. Purely from an aesthetic point of view, I think it’s awesome already. But even now (over a year after this original post) there is a long way to go.

Neovim-QT