Microsoft Future Vision 2015

I’ve always been inspired by the Microsoft ‘Future Vision’ videos which depict a not-too-distant vision of productivity. This year’s entry has not been a disappointment, with a number of interesting UI concepts explored.

The best thing to do is watch the video above to see them all, but I’ve picked four of my favourites below.

Augmented Reality + Tactile Controls

I’m not really what to call this, so I’m just going to call it a ‘holographic puck’. In this instance, a round hardware device can be rotated to make selections on a holographic UI which has been augmented over the top of Kat’s vision.

By mixing the feel of tactile controls with the holographic interfaces you can avoid the strange experience of ‘tapping thin air’ while still providing the users with the infinite possibilities of augmented reality.

Holographic puck

I really like this concept, and it’s not too unrealistic considering the holographic technology coming in Windows 10. Later in the video you see the same hardware device used to transfer the data collected in the first scene.

Flexible Digital Notebooks

Opening the flexible computer

My favourite concept from the whole video is shown when our hero attends a café. The tea selection is shown on this flexible display, and when Kat opens it all of her personal stuff is automatically available to her.

While I think the folding doesn’t look as amazing as it could be (give me a proper notebook style folding, please) – it is a great example of the kind of computers we will be using in the future, and something I really want.

Flexible computer

Being a massive notebook and stationery nerd, I really love the idea of having a flexible notebook computer like this. I hope it happens in the not-too-distant future. The Surface line of computers already has rich inking capability, so it’s only going to get better over time.

Wearable Computing Devices

Throughout the video only one computer looks like it belongs exclusively Kat. The screen on her wrist is probably the equivalent of the smartphone today, being a general purpose communication and computing device.

Wrist computer

This is quite a way off the current Microsoft Band, but the technology sector is certainly going this direction. My Band has already helped give me the motivation to be fitter and healthier, and while we don’t really see much in the way of health statistics in this video, it can certainly be inferred from the way things are going.

Large Table-like Displays

Large table

I also love this large table computer concept. When Kat needs to get some real work done, she just uses her wearable computer to hand off to a bigger computer in a shared workspace.

I’m sure this kind of keyboard-free interaction will be best suited to a world where voice interaction has been perfected. Though I’m sure a software keyboard could be provided. You can even see Kat use a Bluetooth headset (Bragi Dash?) to work with Cortana-like assistant in the top left of the UI.

Captivated by Her

When reading an article about how design is shaping the new Microsoft, I stumbled upon a video by Kat Holmes from last year.

In this video, Kat talks about how conversations power innovation and new experiences. She goes on to discuss how the movie Her both validated and shaped Microsoft’s thinking around their Cortana digital assistant.

Like Kat I have found the movie Her to have a fascinating look at the future of human and computer interaction, primarily through verbal communication and relationship building. While the movie certainly takes the relationship part of the equation to the extreme, I firmly believe that this kind of trust between digital agents and ourselves will eventually enable a new kind of human excellence.

her

Microsoft also collaborated with Vice’s Motherboard to produce a couple of short documentary videos titled Captivated by Her. They’re well worth watching if you’re interested in how human emotion inspires and shapes technology.

Using Microsoft Band in the UK

For a while now I’ve been paying a lot more attention to my fitness by using technology. I’ve been using a Fitbit One to track my passive exercise and MSN Health & Fitness to track active exercise. All this gathered information is then collected into Microsoft HealthVault, along with other base metrics like weight and blood pressure.

Microsoft Band

The Microsoft Band will expand on my current tracking, and replace some elements with better data and more coverage. Hopefully things will still synchronise with HealthVault, and I’ll be able to continue my journey to a healthier lifestyle with a new motivation tool.

I’ve only just got the Microsoft Band, so it’s going to take a little while for me to really understand where it fits into everything, but here are some initial observations:

  • The size and the weight is just fine for my wrist
  • The screen is just fine for normal use, even with its “low” resolution
  • I decided to wear it on my left wrist, with the screen on the inside
  • The GPS, heart rate, and other fitness features work really well
  • I don’t think I want a notification for every email, so I’m turning that off for now
  • Cortana integration is most helpful for setting reminders
  • Sleep tracking seems more accurate than the with my Fitbit
  • Make sure you can run the Health app in the background to enable sync
  • Most importantly, the Microsoft Band works perfectly in the UK

I will get more thoughts down on the Microsoft Band in the coming weeks, but I can say this is a pretty impressive piece of equipment, and I’m really going to enjoy using it as a motivation tool.

Update…

The Microsoft Band is now available in the UK from the Microsoft Store for £170.

In my opinion it is well worth getting.