Development

This category is for all things relating to scripting or programming languages, as well as software construction, design and development.

Captivated by Her

When reading an article about how design is shaping the new Microsoft, I stumbled upon a video by Kat Holmes from last year.

In this video, Kat talks about how conversations power innovation and new experiences. She goes on to discuss how the movie Her both validated and shaped Microsoft’s thinking around their Cortana digital assistant.

Like Kat I have found the movie Her to have a fascinating look at the future of human and computer interaction, primarily through verbal communication and relationship building. While the movie certainly takes the relationship part of the equation to the extreme, I firmly believe that this kind of trust between digital agents and ourselves will eventually enable a new kind of human excellence.

her

Microsoft also collaborated with Vice’s Motherboard to produce a couple of short documentary videos titled Captivated by Her. They’re well worth watching if you’re interested in how human emotion inspires and shapes technology.

Holographic Computing is Coming

Microsoft HoloLens

A bit like something out of their Future Vision videos, Microsoft’s Windows Holographic software and HoloLens hardware look to enable many of the augmented reality dreams technologists like myself have been imagining for years.

Truly I’m excited about this platform, and I’m keen to try out the product as soon as I possibly can, but I still have a large amount of questions.

What happens if you put your hand ‘in front’ of a hologram?
If you have a virtual 80 inch TV screen – what resolution does it have?
Can you stream Xbox games to it?
How long does the battery last?
Can other people hear the audio from the speakers located on the side?
How hot is the air that comes out of the vents?
How well does it work with glasses?
Will there be a holographic version of PowerShell?

It may be a while until all our questions are answered, but until then I’m going to simply imagine the possibilities this new form of computing will bring. Check out the videos below and have a look at Microsoft’s website to get an idea of what’s coming.

As someone who is always trying to simplify and keep things minimalistic, I always question new technologies to decide if they’re really worth investing in. One part of my believes I already have enough computing devices, but another part yearns to try new technology and find new ways to interact with the digital world. The HoloLens definitely seems like something I’m going to want to experience.

Will it be a success? Only time will tell. But future versions of the hardware will no doubt be smaller, and have better field of view. One day this kind of thing will simply be built into a normal pair of glasses – but that’s a little way off.

More to come soon.

Remote Desktop to the Cloud

Remote Desktop for Windows Desktop

For the last six months I’ve been using an Windows 8.1 virtual machine running in Microsoft Azure for various day-to-day developer activities. It has ended up being extremely useful to have a full Windows machine that’s accessible from any place and any device.

Azure

The VM I’m using is A2 Standard and running Windows 8.1, set up with my Microsoft account so all my apps are working on it properly – from Windows Store to Office 365.

Most importantly it also provides an always-on development platform for all my applications even when my main PC is being reinstalled with the Windows 10 technical preview builds. I have access to Visual Studio, F# Interactive, Node.js and all my usual scripting tools in PowerShell at any time.

Remote Desktop for Windows Phone

The remote desktop client for Windows Phone is truly brilliant too, with support for a virtual mouse pad enabling me to get access to applications like Visual Studio or Outlook at any time. True it’s a little fiddly, but it’s really powerful.

Azure’s Virtual Machines suite me as I have a number of credits every month, and nowhere at home to keep a server that could be on 24/7. Overall I’m really pleased with the service.

Initial thoughts on the Windows 10 Technical Preview

Now that the second preview build of the Technical Preview of Windows 10 is out, I decided the time was right to share some of my initial thoughts on this early preview for Windows 10.

Windows 10 Universal Apps

First of all, it’s important to understand that, for casual computer use, I was very happy using Windows 8.1 on my Surface Pro 2, both on the touch screen and when plugged into a monitor, keyboard and mouse. I didn’t just “put up with Windows 8″ like many folk seem to. I embraced it and it changed the way I used a computer.

I embraced Windows 8 and I loved using full-screen apps at home

Simplicity is something I am always striving for. For example, I don’t have any icons on my desktop and I only pin the minimal amount of apps to my taskbar. The majority of the apps I used at home were ‘modern’ full screen apps. This means that I could have Xbox Music playing in the background with no icon in the task bar or any other visible UI unless I have it snapped to the screen. I understand that for some users this was mind-blowingly hard to understand, but I liked the simplicity.

Windows 10 Taskbar

With Windows 10, performing a task, like listening to music, means that there is an icon in the task bar. This is better for the majority of users, but for me it takes some getting used to.

Using Windows 10 is already better for multitasking and getting things done

The first two builds of the Technical Preview have been focused squarely on the experience in the enterprise, and specifically, use with a keyboard and mouse inside of the desktop environment. Here are where things really shine in Windows 10.

Unlike the way I was using full screen Windows 8 apps at home, I use multiple screens and desktop applications when I’m at work. Three screens means I can multi-task between development applications like Visual Studio, SQL Management Studio and PowerShell at the same time, but I still have to minimize and swap windows around when switching to communication and note taking applications like OneNote and Outlook.

Windows 10 Task View

Windows 10 includes some fantastic virtual desktop features which help around this, and I’m really looking forward to running Windows 10 at work. I could use the Task View to switch between these two logical tasks rather than minimising multiple windows.

Unfortunately the Windows team couldn’t get everything done in time for the first preview. The biggest things that are missing for me are around using the touch screen, and modern apps in full screen. The good news is that we do know that future builds will include features like Continuum, that are specifically designed for hybrid computers like the Surface.

Touch screen is still coming, and hopefully it will be as great as the desktop

With two builds already, it seems that the velocity is pretty fast. I’m looking forward to getting my hands on new features. Windows 10 is shaping up to be one of the most important versions of Windows ever – in terms of both the features and the speedy development process.

Windows 10 has an improved Console

Windows 10 Console

It’s true, the Windows command line is making a comeback.

With Windows 10, a number of ‘experimental’ options have been added to the console host which work with both the classic cmd.exe and PowerShell. This includes features like CTRL-C and CTRL-V for copy and paste, plus new text selection hotkeys, resizing, transparency and more.

And, by the looks of Microsoft’s UserVoice forum, this looks like just the beginning:

In the dawn of time, the original Windows console was created. For millenia, geeks and developers (typically both) steeled their nerves and leveraged the console’s utility. After a (very) short time, a great lacking was noticed. And so, legions of ever intrepid command line mavens migrated to other platforms and other consoles, ‘til but a stalwart few remained. Now, today, with a small rumbling, the ancient, weary console heaves a great sigh and rises. The journey to legitimacy has begun.

WE’RE BACK!

If these kinds of features are important to you, don’t forget to give your feedback to Microsoft so that they know that the command line is still relevant in 2014.